Courses

Five women’s studies courses are required for an undergraduate minor in women’s studies. WMS 200 is required for all minors. In addition, students can select four courses from the following list of offerings. Note that WMS 350 special topics courses do not require prerequisites. 

Why is it that we consume media in the ways we do? Are you a passive consumer, or an active one? Why do media use the techniques they do to draw in audiences? Even as media literate as intelligent individuals we are controlled by our media? These are just some of the questions we will consider as we explore the topic of media theory/history. Although I lead this course from a critical perspective, I will introduce you to more social science/behavior theories throughout the semester. However, as you peruse the syllabus, you will see that we will concentrate on a few key critical theories (as they apply to media): feminist theory, critical race theory, queer theory, and governmentality.

Credit Hours: 3

There are many oversimplified categorizations by which societies make distinctions among their members, including race, class, gender, and age. Such distinctions often lead to an inequitable distribution of political power, social well-being, and the resources available to individual members of society. In this course we seek to increase our awareness and understanding of such inequities and the power of the mass media in creating and potentially destroying them.

This course explores the images, ideologies, representations, historical context and filmic techniques associated in films made primarily by and about women. 

Credit Hours: 3

This course is taught through a feminist lens, where students understand the social construction of gender and how it relates to crime and its victims. There is a section of this course dedicated to violence against women including rape/sexual assault, domestic violence, and sexual harassment. 

Credit Hours: 3

This course considers the interrelationships among race, gender and class in the criminal justice system.  Examined are the patterns and variations in crime across these variables.  The assumptions, biases and relative strengths and weaknesses of theories of crime as applied across race, gender and class will be addressed.  Attention will be given to women and minorities as offenders, victims and professionals in criminal justice with particular emphasis given to the disproportionate criminal justice sanctioning of crimes by and against women and minorities. An historical perspective will contextualize and guide the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Seminar examines an issue affecting society and its relationship to the criminal justice system. Topics might include a discussion of ethics and the criminal justice system, computerized information systems and the criminal justice system, intimate and stranger crimes, or the criminal justice system in the future. (Concentration: criminology, law enforcement, law adjudication or penology).

Credit Hours: 3

Seminar examines an issue affecting society and its relationship to the criminal justice system. Topics might include a discussion of ethics and the criminal justice system, computerized information systems and the criminal justice system, intimate and stranger crimes, or the criminal justice system in the future. (Concentration: criminology, law enforcement, law adjudication or penology).

Credit Hours: 3

This seminar is designed to examine a current issue in criminology and criminal justice of particular concern. Topics such as the future of crime and justice, mala prohibita offenses and their adjudication, or the criminal or juvenile justice system and contemporary social problems may be offered depending on the critical issues of the period. This course may be taken more than once as long as the subject matter differs.

Credit Hours: 3

Introduction to English literature by and about women, from the Middle Ages to 1700. Works of poetry, prose, and drama will be studied in generic and historical contexts as symptoms of cultural change. Interdisciplinary approach to gender, discrimination, social justice make this course an elective in the Women’s Studies Minor.

This course develops skills students need to write successfully in college, in the workplace, and in their everyday lives. It prepares students for the various types of writing they would do as professional editors or writers, including synthesizing information from various sources, providing feedback to other writers to guide their revision, managing multi-authored documents, and co-authoring. (Advanced Composition; part of Writing Studies minor)

ENG 351 - Grant Writing

Themes in American literature, such as Captivity Narratives through the 19th Century; Imagining Native Americans; The American Dream and Immigrant Writers; Poverty in the 20th Century American Literature; Freedom and Determinism in American Literature. May be taken up to three times, with different authors or topics. (Advanced American)

The lives and works of modern women artists will be studied both critically and in historical context. Gallery visits, lectures by women artists working today and drawing in the manner of those studied will supplement the course.

A survey of various themes and social questions regarding the position that women have held in French society from the 12th century to the present, as these are treated in poetry, prose fiction, cinema and drama by and about female authors. Conducted in English, with all texts read in translation, this course is open to all students, regardless of their background in French.
This course cannot be used to satisfy a foreign-language requirement for nonmajors. It may count as a culture course required for the minor.

This course introduces students to the history of American women from colonial times to the present. It is designed to expose students to what women did and what they were told to do, and to the tension between them. Students will be reading about both “famous” and ordinary women, and will have the opportunity to read what women had to say about themselves and their situation. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which race, class, and ethnicity shaped women’s experiences.

Credit Hours: 3

The contributions of African American women have been long overlooked in American history. This course will address the lives of black women from the 1600s through the twenty-first century. Specifically, students will learn about African American women’s experiences in freedom, slavery, domesticity, commerce, politics, religion, and social movements. 

Credit Hours: 3

In 2020, the U.S. celebrates the 100-year ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women the right to vote. This course explores important themes in U.S. history by studying the push for women’s right to vote in the U.S. Students will examine firsthand documents related to gender, race, citizenship and political rights, political parties and campaigns, progressivism and conservatism, and organizational efforts. The course ties suffrage events into the wider history. 

Credit Hours: 3

A historical and legal overview of women in the American justice system. Emphasis on the equal protection arguments, remedies for discrimination, evolving concepts in the law of rape, consumer rights and employment practices. (Concentration: American political system.)

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the growing  field of women and politics, specifically women and politics in the United States. Specific topics include the origins and goals of the women's movements, political participation by women in citizen level activities, women elected and appointed officials in government, and public policy goals and accomplishments of the women's movements. (Concentration: American political system.)

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the evidence for the existence of sex differences in behavior and the biological and social theories which attempt to account for gender differences in our society as well as cross-culturally. An attempt is made to understand the dynamic and perplexing changes facing men and women today.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: PSY 101

A survey of issues pertinent to the life and role of women in the church and society, with special focus on equality, development and peace.

Credit Hours: 3

  • CD, SS

Credit Hours: 3

Review of the status of women in American society: socialization, role, self-conception, and participation.

Credit Hours: 3

In this course, students will explore the impact of gender, race and ethnicity, and social class on women’s mental, physical, and economic well-being. Through investigation of their own experiences as women and men, and through readings and classroom activities, students will become familiar with a variety of contradictions confronting women social workers and women clients. Gender inequality within the social work profession and strategies for change will be highlighted.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100, or permission of instructor

This course examines various social, cultural, and political issues in contemporary society. We will analyze how women's lives and experiences are shaped by the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, socioeconomic class, and the like. A range of topics are discussed including gender socialization, education, body image, sports, media and popular culture, health and the environment, relationships, work/family life, gendered violence, and activism and social change.  

Credit Hours: 3

This course offers in depth study of topics of interest to women's studies scholarship. May be taken up to three times with different course material. Current offerings include Women and Film; Women and Music; Gender, Race, and Social Media; Pop Culture in America; Feminist Non-fiction; and Women Writers. Please note that WMS 350 special topics courses do not require a prerequisite. 

Credit Hours: 3

In this course we will read and discuss short works of nonfiction (e.g. personal narratives, essays, memoir excerpts, etc.) focused on a specific author, time period, or topic. The particular focus varies by semester. Students will use these texts as models for their own nonfiction writing. Through the assigned readings and class discussion, students will also enhance their understanding of their own and others' lives, current events, and social justice issues. 

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites:

An independent or special topics course on a gender-related issue, or an internship or co-op with a gender-related focus may be substituted for one of the five required courses. Permission of the coordinator of the women's studies minor is required for either substitution. Please note that WMS 350 courses do not require a prerequisite. 

Credit Hours: 3

This course explores the images, ideologies, representations, historical context and filmic techniques associated in films made primarily by and about women. 

Credit Hours: 3

A special topics course on a women-related issue, or an internship or co-op with a women-related focus may be substituted for one of the five required courses. Permission of the coordinator of the women's studies minor is required for either substitution.