Curriculum

Niagara University’s undergraduate program in food and consumer-packaged goods marketing prepares students for exciting careers in the innovative and strategic world of global food and brand marketing. The marketing department offers dynamic and relevant courses demanded by industry today and provides outstanding career opportunities through internships, networking opportunities, and personal relationships with executives of top local and national companies. The faculty are not only accomplished Ph.D. academics, but also highly successful business executives who bring real-world knowledge and success to the classroom.

Food and CPG marketing (consumer-packaged goods) is a concentration within the B.S. marketing degree. Thus, students must complete the same general education and core business courses that are required by all students in the College of Business Administration.

The curriculum has been developed in close consultation with industry experts and professionals to deliver the most impactful and relevant learning experience of any program of its kind in the world. Students take five core classes and master key required industry skills by participating in sponsored internship programs and industry certifications. Each of these courses incorporates case studies and applications provided by industry members to enhance student knowledge of current industry issues and challenges. In addition, classes include significant participation by industry experts.

Food and CPG Marketing Concentration

This course will familiarize students with the global food industry at all levels and in all segments. Basics of agricultural production and economics, food distribution, wholesaling and retailing both on the retail and food service sides of the business are covered. Critical social/cultural changes with impacts on the food industry will be covered as well as an understanding of global food supply and inequity in distribution.

Credit Hours: 3

Application of information technology utilized in the marketing of food with emphasis on analytics associated with price, cost, merchandise, forecasts and performance ratios.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is to guide students’ understanding of current merchandising principles and applications related to marketing wholesale and retail food, products and services. Emphasis will be on the application of economic principles, management tools and marketing principles learned in other courses to understand effective marketing practices by food producers, processors and distributors in response to the rapidly changing and highly diverse consuming public. Students will learn about issues of sales promotion, inventory management and assortment decisions used by manufacturers, retailers and wholesalers. Students will also be conversant in the issues and events that are shaping the future of the food system including issues of supply and safety.

Credit Hours: 3

The purpose of this class is twofold.  First, to allow students the opportunity to develop competency in advanced marketing analytics.  Second, to take the insights from using advanced marketing analytics and transcribe and integrate them into compelling presentations for internal and external company use in their respective marketing careers.  Students will be walked through analytics and measures that senior level marketing managers employ in their jobs everyday including topics such as: market dynamics, segmentation, forecasting, pricing, distribution, and promotion.  In addition to lectures from real-world faculty, the students learning experience will be enhanced through assignments and final project.

Credit Hours: 3

The purpose of this class is to introduce the students to the innovation process used to develop consumer goods, the considerations that should be kept in mind by marketers to create the best chances for launch success, and real world examples of both successes and failures with respect to both products and the retail environment itself.

Credit Hours: 3

Business Electives

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities.

Credit Hours: 3

Suggested General Education Courses

This course introduces the non-science major to chemical and scientific concepts through a study of foods and food-related processes. No previous scientific training is expected. The student should also gain from the course a greater appreciation of why things are done in certain ways, while learning that some practices have absolutely no scientific basis.

Credit Hours: 3

This course places special emphasis on the institutional aspects of food and beverage management in restaurants, cafeterias, hotels, motels and clubs. The knowledge necessary to succeed in an entry-level management position in the hospitality industry is presented. Subjects covered include: foodservice sanitation and procedures, tools and equipment, cooking principles, and quality standards. The student will understand production methods for various food types.

Credit Hours: 3

Major Requirements Outside Food Marketing

*Students may choose one of ECO 301, ECO 320, or ECO 350

The course presents an overview of the obligations and restraints imposed by law on businesses, as well as the rights and opportunities which are conferred. Students will gain insights into the legal environment in which businesses operate and the application of legal rules to resolve different issues.

Credit Hours: 3

The nature of money, monetary standards, the commercial banking system; the Federal Reserve; monetary theory and policy; fiscal policy

Credit Hours: 3

This course consists of essentially two modules. The first deals with product development issues and the design of global market offerings. The second deals with the planning, organization, implementation and control of integrated marketing communications. Coverage of advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing and personal selling along with emerging and nontraditional tools, and their integrated management for the accomplishment of promotional objectives. It includes both a strategic focus as well as an emphasis on creative campaign development.

Credit Hours: 3

The economic basis for trade among nations; comparative advantage, exchange rate systems, balance-of-payments, trade barriers, investment and development; international economic policies.

Credit Hours: 3

A study of the growth of national income (i.e., economic growth) and changes in the technical and institutional arrangements by which it is produced (i.e., economic development). The main focus of the course rests on the non-Western third world countries.

Credit Hours: 3

College of Business Administration Core

A study of consumer and producer behavior in the determination of prices and output, wages and productivity, profit and market structure.

Credit Hours: 3

This is an introductory course which views accounting as a source of information and a tool for effective decision making. The course provides a basic understanding of the concepts of financial accounting and includes analysis and interpretation of financial reports with emphasis on their use by external parties such as stockholders and creditors. Computer/Internet applications included.

Credit Hours: 3

This introductory course focuses on accounting information as a tool for effective decision making within an organization. The course provides a basic understanding of the procedures of management accounting as a means of identifying management problems and evaluating potential solutions. It emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach to the use of management reports by managers inside the business organization. Computer/Internet applications included.

Credit Hours: 3

Theories and practices of management and organization are studied, with a major focus on planning, organizing, leading and controlling. General topics include goals and strategy formulation, decision making, leadership, motivation, communication, teamwork, innovation, ethics and social responsibility. The course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in organizational management.

Credit Hours: 3

Marketing philosophies, influences, strategies and practices. Topics include: strategic planning, environmental influences, marketing research, consumer and business markets, segmentation and targeting, international marketing and strategies for products, prices, distribution and promotion.

Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces the student to those statistical models and methods that are used in a business environment to assist in making effective decisions. It includes, but is not limited to, time series analysis, regression, Chi-square, nonparametric statistics and ANOVA.

Credit Hours: 3

The role of financial planning and the acquisition and utilization of funds are stressed along with analytical concepts for evaluating financial decisions. Includes financial analysis, planning and control, long-term investment decisions and short- and long-term financing.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in the management of information systems (MIS) and how these systems support decision making. The course focuses on the MIS structure, tools and analysis techniques required to solve business problems. Embedded segments on career preparation and development are included in this course.

Credit Hours: 3

A capstone course designed to provide the business student with a foundation in the concepts of business strategy and policies. The course will focus on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. Students will be required to integrate the knowledge that they have acquired in previous business courses with strategic management techniques.

Credit Hours: 3