WRT 100 FAQs

This page attempts to answer some of the frequently asked questions that students have about WRT 100.

WRT 100 focuses primarily on different types of academic writing such as essays, literature reviews, position papers, reviews, annotated bibliographies, and reports. Students in WRT 100 do not write fiction or poetry. If you’re interested in creative writing, we invite you to enroll in ENG 221: Creative Writing when it is offered. If you like all kinds of writing, we invite you to check out our Writing Studies minor, which allows you to do many different types of writing.

We attempt to keep WRT 100 class sizes small so that students get individual attention and lots of help with improving their writing. To avoid overloaded classes, we ask that you please join an open section of WRT 100 or postpone taking WRT 100 if you cannot fit it into your current schedule.

If you absolutely must be in a certain section, you can attempt to force add a specific section of WRT 100. To do this:

  1. Obtain a force add form from the Records Office.
  2. See the instructor of the course to discuss whether there is room for you. The instructor does not have to let you into the course, and their decision is final.
  3. If the instructor agrees, have them sign the form.
  4. Bring the form to the WRT 100 program director (Professor Little ) for a signature. The program director will not sign a force add form that the instructor has not signed.
  5. Bring the signed form to the Records Office.

The WRT 100 instructors take different approaches to teaching the course, but all sections of WRT 100 have the following things in common:

  • Ten learning outcomes that all students accomplish by the end of the course
  • Common policies for attendance and student expectations
  • At least one assignment where students practice information literacy skills
  • At least 15 pages of polished writing produced by the end of the semester
So, instructors may use different textbooks, or assign different writing assignments, but all sections have the same learning outcomes and goals.

During the first two weeks of classes, you could change sections of WRT 100. After the first two weeks of classes, we advise you NOT to change sections, and you cannot change sections during the middle of the semester. This is because different sections do different types of writing assignments, and so work from one section will not automatically transfer into another.

No. The only way to be exempted from WRT 100 is by scoring 3 or higher on the AP Language and Composition exam or by completing an equivalent course from another university and transferring the credit to Niagara University. If you have met either of these qualifications and you are still signed up for WRT 100, see your advisor as soon as possible to drop the course and add another one. Be sure to make sure that credit for the course appears on your transcript.

In WRT 100, like most courses at Niagara, you do a lot of in-class work using active learning strategies to help you understand and apply course concepts. These activities might include: brainstorming, in-class writing, practice writing essay exams, whole-class and small group discussions, usage exercises, editing practice, and other types of activities. You’ll also engage in peer review, where you give and receive feedback on each other’s writing in small groups in order to improve your writing and editing skills. All of this work is a vital part of helping you to become a more skilled and confident writer, and this work is usually assessed as part of your overall course grade.

Since WRT 100 is a course where participation and attendance are necessary for mastering skills and concepts, the program has implemented an attendance policy with penalties for absences over a certain limit. You can find the policy on your syllabus and in the common policies document.

If a disruption in your personal life causes you to miss a significant number of classes, please contact your instructor as soon as possible. The options available to you depend on your progress in the course and the amount of time remaining in the semester.  Here are some possible options:

  • You could drop or withdraw from WRT 100 and take it again the following semester.
  • Sometimes a student and an instructor can come to an agreement about making up late work that allows a student to pass the course.
  • If it is very late in the semester and a student has already completed most of the work for the course, an instructor may give a student an incomplete to allow them to finish missed work. Incompletes are given at the instructor's discretion only.

If you are unable to reach an agreement with your instructor, talk to the program director, Dr. Little, who will attempt to help you resolve the situation.

Here is the procedure that you should follow for resolving problems with the course:

  • See your instructor privately to discuss the problem and attempt a resolution.
  • If you and your instructor cannot reach an agreement, see the program director, Dr. Little.  He will attempt to bring you and the instructor together to resolve the issue, or to clarify the policy and its application.
  • If you do not approve of the decision made by the program director, you may appeal to the Dean’s Office by making an appointment with Dr. McGlen, the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Here is the procedure that you should follow for resolving problems with grades:

  • See your instructor privately to discuss your grade.
  • If you and your instructor cannot reach an agreement, see the program director, Dr. Little.  He will attempt to bring you and the instructor together to resolve the issue, or to clarify the policy and its application.
  • If you do not approve of the decision made by the program director, you may appeal to the Dean’s Office by making an appointment with Dr. McGlen, the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.