Courses

For a full description of the course, go to the selected course and click on it.

Pre-Professional Sequence

An introduction to the profession and beginning generalist social work practice. The values, knowledge, and skills necessary for practice will be critically examined and discussed, along with the social problems of concern to the profession. Social work in the empowerment tradition will be emphasized. This course requires 25 hours of service learning. This course is required for social work majors and minors.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in the fall & spring semester

This course focuses on the historical development and structure of the social services system. In the evaluation of social policies, specific attention will be given to populations at risk, such as African Americans, Native Americans, women, persons with disabilities, and gays and lesbians, who all have encountered social injustice. Students will learn how these groups resisted efforts to dominate them and how they empowered themselves.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100; Recommended POL 101

This course is designed to stimulate and enhance a student’s understanding of various cultural issues that are relevant to his or her professional aspirations. One thrust of this course is to develop in students a respect and appreciation for diversity in all its forms. It is intended that this course will facilitate effective communication among diverse populations. This course requires 20 hours of service learning. This course is required for social work majors.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence. The course provides students with basic descriptive knowledge about how biological, social and psychological systems affect the human person from birth through young adulthood. In addition, students assess the strengths and limitations of various theories of human behavior for diverse populations, and consider alternative and possible theories that change or extend traditional theories.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100, BIO 101, SOC 101, PSY 101

This course is a continuation of SWK 211. The course provides students with basic descriptive knowledge about how biological, social and psychological systems affect the human person from middle adulthood through late life. In addition, students assess the strengths and limitations of various theories of human behavior for diverse populations, and consider alternative and possible theories that change or extend traditional theories.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100, BIO 101, SOC 101, PSY 101 and SWK 211

The study of society and social institutions with a focus on race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexuality, deviance, culture, subcultures,work,families,social change, education and much more.

Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to basic psychology theory and research.

Credit Hours: 3

Study of the essentials of American Government.

Credit Hours: 3

One social work elective needs to be completed.

Credit Hours: 3

Professional Sequence

This course focuses on teaching the skills and tasks of policy practice. The first half of the course reviews the economic and cultural underpinnings of social policy in the United States with emphasis on populations at risk. The second half is devoted to learning the tasks of policy practice: agenda setting, problem defining, proposal writing, policy enacting, policy implementing, and policy assessing.

  /  offered in spring semester Prerequisites: SWK 100, SWK 200 and POL 101 (majors only)

This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence on social work methods with individuals, families and groups. The course focuses on developing the necessary skills for generalist social work practice from an empowerment perspective. Areas explored include: theories and models of social work practice with populations at risk, skills of effective social work practice, and effective social work practice with individuals. This course requires 25 hours of service learning.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100, SWK 200, SWK 211, SWK 212 (majors only)

This course is a continuation of SWK 310. The course specifically focuses on social work practice with families and groups, with an emphasis on populations at risk. Content areas that are explored include: professional values and ethics, family practice in the social work context, problem-centered family practice, social work practice with groups, and helping clients to negotiate social systems. This course requires 25 hours of service learning.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 310 (majors only)

Students will acquire the knowledge and basic skills necessary to evaluate generalist social work practice activities. Students will develop an understanding of factors affecting research results including the political and ethical context of research, the impact of diversity as it affects the research process, and the reporting of social work research.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester   /   Prerequisites: MAT 102 and CIS 233 and SWK 310 (majors only)

This course focuses on developing the skills necessary for effective generalist social work practice with large groups, organizations and communities. The course teaches the skills of community organizing from an empowerment perspective. Content areas that are explored include: historical goals of community organizing, empowerment and community organizations, mobilization and social action, feminist perspectives on community organizing, and social workers as managers.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 310, SWK 320, co-requisite: SWK 425 and SWK 427 (majors only)

Students attend a weekly two-hour seminar that integrates the field practicum with the social work curriculum. Students present and analyze their own client cases. Special topics such as brief solution therapy, crisis intervention and policy advocacy will be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 320, co-requisite SWK 427 (majors only)

This course is a continuation of SWK 425. Students attend a weekly two-hour seminar that integrates the field practicum with the social work curriculum. Students present and analyze their own client cases. A variety of topics, such as group techniques, art therapy, treatment of sexual problems, and elements of mediation will be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 420, SWK 425 and SWK 427; co-requisite SWK 428 (majors only)

Students must complete a field practicum application process. Students spend two full days per week in the fall semester in a community agency working under the supervision of a qualified social work practitioner. Students apply the theoretical social work material learned in classes to real life situations.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 320, Co-requisites SWK 420 and SWK 425 (majors only)

This course is a continuation of SWK 427. Students spend two full days per week during the spring semester in a community agency working under the supervision of a qualified social work practitioner. Students apply the theoretical social work material learned in classes to real life situations.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semester   /   Prerequisites: SWK 420, SWK 425, SWK 427; co-requisite SWK 426 (majors only)

Social Work Electives

Social work majors need to complete two social work electives.  See list below.

The course explores poverty and discrimination. We will explore: How is poverty defined? How is poverty measured? What does living in poverty or being raised in poverty do to individuals, families, communities, and society? What can the poor do to help themselves? What can we do to help the poor?

Credit Hours: 3

Areas of special interest to students are offered. Examples of topics include: crisis intervention, school social work, disability services, social work with military families, human trafficking and domestic violence. Emphasis will be placed on increasing students knowledge of practice, policy and research issues. Presentations, field visits are part of the seminar format.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will present a survey of contemporary issues and problems in human sexuality from a social, psychological, biological, cross-cultural, and clinical perspective. Topics such as sexual orientation, adolescent sexuality, teen pregnancy, infertility, family planning, sex research, coercive forms of sex, and treatment of sexual problems will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3

This course deals directly with the psychological, social, and behavioral dynamics inherent in confronting the issue of death and dying, from both the personal and professional perspectives. Aspects related to euthanasia, refusing life-sustaining medical treatment, factors influencing grief and bereavement among people from diverse populations, and hospice care are some of the topics explored. This is a required course for the gerontology minor.

Credit Hours: 3

In this course, students will explore the impact of gender, race and ethnicity, and social class on women’s mental, physical, and economic well-being. Through investigation of their own experiences as women and men, and through readings and classroom activities, students will become familiar with a variety of contradictions confronting women social workers and women clients. Gender inequality within the social work profession and strategies for change will be highlighted.

Credit Hours: 3

This course focuses on individual and family needs in the areas of physical and mental health. Issues of access, quality and cost of care, especially as they affect populations at risk, are explored from a social work context. Topics to be considered include the impact of physical and mental illness on individual and family functioning and the development of individual and family coping mechanisms.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an overview of issues in the field of gerontology as well as an introduction to various intervention techniques for working with the elderly. Social service programs and social policies affecting the aged will be examined. (Methods of empowering the aged will be explored.) Appreciation for and empowerment of longliving people will be emphasized. This is a required course for the gerontology minor.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an overview of the problems, needs and rights of children and their families. Emphasis will be placed on increasing sensitivity to gender, racial and cultural factors that affect the provision of child welfare service to populations at risk. Basic counseling techniques that can be used in empowering children in child welfare settings will also be presented.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100

This course will examine the role of the social worker in the treatment and prevention of alcoholism and substance abuse. Such topics as client assessment, counseling issues and techniques, self-help and recovery, and social policy issues will be examined. The efficacy of preventive efforts with diverse populations will be analyzed.

Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces the student to social work methods of working with family dynamics and family counseling. Various aspects of family functioning will be explored with an emphasis on social problems confronting families, issues of ethnic and cultural difference, and efficacy of social work intervention methods and techniques. Ways of supporting and empowering families will be actively examined.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: SWK 100, recommended SWK 310

A work-study program providing relevant employment experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Registration is to be arranged through the Chairperson.

  /  offered in summer Prerequisites: SWK 100 and SWK 200

Other

This course allows a social work honors student to engage in substantive research related to the field. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 3