Survival Tips

  • Be extremely flexible, put you best foot forward and plan ahead.
  • When you meet your Cooperating/Associate teacher, make sure that you are given the opportunity to do your own lesson/unit plans. Some teachers think that they are helping you by giving you their lesson plans, and it is the easier way out but in the end you are better off doing your own. It will help you identify your own teaching strategies and strengths.
  • You should meet with your Cooperating/Associate Teacher at the end of everyday. If asked, you should attend all extra curriculum activities. Always be professional. If you are going to be late or can not make the activity, call the teacher. Always have a number of class room strategies ready to use.  Always smile and greet your students.
  • Take one day at a time. Some lessons will bomb. No matter how well you planned, no matter how well you thought the lesson would go, things go wrong and that’s OK. Ask a lot of questions.
  • Here’s what they don’t tell you….time goes by really quickly! You may get stressed, but take a deep breath and do your best. It’s all worth it in the end. Don’t ever give up. You’ve picked the most rewarding job!
  • Always back up your memory stick or lesson files.
  • Enjoy, it’s not as scary as you’ve heard. (Providing that your placement is a good one and your Cooperating/Associate teacher is reasonable). Stay on top of your marking. The time will fly. Enjoy yourself! It only gets better and better.
  • Ask your Cooperating/Associate teacher about a preferred classroom style.
  • Keep your notes and binders extremely organized. Do whatever your Cooperating/Associate teacher wants you to do.
  • Trust your instincts. Let kids be kids, let the students help you. Know it’s okay to be confused.
  • Each day and each class is a new experience and a fresh start. Watch and listen as much as possible.
  • Ask for feed back from your Cooperating/Associate teacher and anyone else who is experienced. Plan, plan, plan. Try different approaches and techniques.
  • Although the university provides you with classroom management techniques, only you will learn how to manage your students.
  • You are still learning how to teach, you are not an expert, but by the end of your placement, you will feel more like a teacher.
  • Don’t take things personally, not every lesson will go well. No one expects you to be perfect.
  • It will be a lot of fun and you will find out a lot about yourself. Don’t expect to be perfect, this is your time to grow and find out what works for you.
  • Do not get discouraged. No one expects you to be a pro right off the bat.
  • Be honest, be yourself, be confident and never doubt yourself.
  • Remain confident. Some days will leave you thinking that you aren’t doing a good job. Seek assistance from other teachers, they will be eager to help you. Connect with your students, something as simple as a greeting.