Courses

An introduction to the scientific study of interactional patterns in social groups. Special emphasis is placed on the structures, processes, and problems of contemporary society.

Credit Hours: 3

An analysis of structure and processes within contemporary organizations including the nature, environment, effectiveness, and theory of organizations; focus on power, conflict, resolution, communication, change, innovation, and centralization.

Credit Hours: 3

Comparative and social-cultural study of Native American cultures. Included are analysis of customs, social structures and processes, and social change.

Credit Hours: 3

An overview of the branch of anthropology that investigates ancient societies through the material remains they have left behind. Students will learn that archaeologists do detailed, systematic detective work aimed at answering questions about human behavior. We will study archaeological goals, methods, and theories, and review famous discoveries.

Credit Hours: 3

Historical and contemporary perspectives of the causes of crime and deviance in society and the treatment of offenders. Major social, psychological, and economic theories will be assessed. Nonbehavioral science perspectives will also be examined.

Credit Hours: 3

Overview of periods and themes which structure understanding of black experiences, including: African roots, European colonialism, slavery, emancipation, Reconstruction, migration, civil rights era. Introduction to issues experienced by contemporary black families and communities, with attention given to the variety of religious, political, economic, educational, and cultural experiences in black communities.

Credit Hours: 3

In-depth study of issues experienced by contemporary black families and communities, with attention given to the variety of religious, political, economic, educational, and cultural experiences in black communities.

Credit Hours: 3

The history, philosophy, and current status of incarceration as a correctional alternative. The individual, societal, and public policy liabilities and benefits of incarceration as a post-conviction strategy. The legal rights of prisoners.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will consider the place of youth in bringing about cultural change. We will explore the worlds of youth subcultures and “scenes.” In doing so, we should gain an understanding and appreciation for the work done by those who dwell on the fringe of accepted norms.

Credit Hours: 3

An analysis of specific sociological topics that have developed as strong theoretical and research areas of current inquiry, including adolescence, gender roles, work, sport, leisure, literature, sex, sociology of knowledge, educational systems, media and popular culture.

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of social problems in contemporary society, such as poverty, homelessness, substance abuse, violence and crime. Additional topics may include problems with environment, education, health care, technology and media.

Credit Hours: 3

Deviance as a social process with concentration on selected cases of individual and group pathologies including mental illness, sexual behavior, drug behavior.

Credit Hours: 3

Sociological analysis of relationships and families, including dating, cohabitation, marriage, divorce and same-sex relationships.

Credit Hours: 3

Review of the status of women in American society: socialization, role, self-conception, and participation.

Credit Hours: 3

The social theories of representative social thinkers; study of the leading developments in sociological theory both classical and contemporary.

Credit Hours: 3

An appraisal of theory and research in social stratification; examination of the hierarchal ranking, particularly in the United States. Focus on social inequality and poverty.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of major social psychological theories and topics with special emphasis on the nature of selfhood. Prime focus lies on the dramaturgical analysis of self-presentation, identity, and stigmatization.

Credit Hours: 3

Culture of cities, ecology of the city. Social changes and effects on urban institutions. Problems facing urban dwellers. City planning, resettlement and theories of the city of the future.

Credit Hours: 3

A general consideration of the causes, processes, and effects of postmodernism, with a major focus on the organizational structures, occupational variations, and current problems of post-modern societies.

Credit Hours: 3

Study of humanity and culture from the beginnings in the Stone Ages. Fundamentals of primitive community life. Analysis of individual cultures; the simpler cultures; representative cultures of the main ethnic areas.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the relation of culture and social structure to the development of personality; analysis of national character, relation of subcultures and personality traits.

Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to social research methods. Basic elements of the logic of research design, problems of measurement, methods for determining casual relationships, and various types of research design and methodology are presented, including sampling, questionnaire construction, and data collection methods.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: SOC 101 and junior or senior standing

Students will be given an opportunity to apply the information obtained from SOC 320 and to experience the use of a number of different data collection methods. The class will conduct a complete evaluation study and/or a survey research study.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: SOC 320

The study of aging as a cultural, social, psychological, and biological process. Various theories of aging will be presented and discussed. Emphasis on aging in American society.

Credit Hours: 3

The social contexts and correlates of the various forms of religious expression throughout history: creeds, codes, cults, and organizational structures. This course may be used to fulfill a religious studies requirement for students majoring in sociology and social work.

Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to the study of ethnic and racial relations. Emphasis is given to an understanding of social factors as possible bases for prejudice and discrimination, and on social, cultural, and structural influence on ethnic and minority relations, with particular emphasis on conditions in the United States.

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of theory and research concerned with medical care as a social institution. The relation of social factors to illness, and social processes involved in medical education.

Credit Hours: 3

An introduction to sociological theories of social change, including an analysis of the problems of coping with life in a rapidly changing world.

Credit Hours: 3

The relation of social structure to political organization and participation, with special attention to the implications of empirical research on power, voting, and alienation.

Credit Hours: 3

The history and current status of attempts to explain juvenile delinquency. The nature and extent of delinquency and the manner in which juveniles are handled through the judicial process. Innovations in the treatment and punishment of delinquency will be assessed in terms of their effectiveness and social consequences.

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of the history, philosophy, and functioning of community-based correctional programs. Each of the various types of programs, including probation and parole, will be discussed and evaluated. The legal right of ex-offenders will also be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student’s major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 6

This seminar sequence investigates issues experienced by contemporary black families and communities, with attention given to the variety of religious, political, economic, educational, and cultural experiences in black communities. Students will demonstrate research skills by designing projects in SOC 431 and implementing projects in SOC 432.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: SOC 231-232 and permission of instructor

Required of senior (junior by permission only) sociology majors. An integrative, reflective capstone course to synthesize major theoretical and empirical elements of key substantive issues in sociology.

Credit Hours: 3

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students interested in taking an internship/co-op should talk to their adviser.

Course description goes here.

Credit Hours: 3