Courses

Graduate Education Courses

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the basic principles of measurement and evaluation of learning with emphasis upon test construction in accord with instructional objectives. Consideration is given to the statistical principles of validity and reliability, and the variety, selection and use of standardized assessments for all learners. Methods of assigning grades to students will also be explored.

Credit Hours: 3

This course has been developed to help build teachers’ knowledge and skills in scientifically based reading research which will enable them to teach all children to master reading by the end of grade three. By providing teachers and instructional support personnel with quality training through the application of scientifically based reading research, to reading instruction, assessment, diagnosis, progress monitoring and intervention, reading instructional effectiveness will occur. This course will cover modules one through four.
Module one: Reading and Language Arts: The Context of Change.
Module two: Phonological Awareness and Phonemic Awareness.
Module three: The Alphabetic Principle and Phonics.
Module four: Word Study.

Credit Hours: 3

This course has been developed to help build teachers’ knowledge and skills in scientifically based reading research which will enable them to teach all children to master reading by the end of grade three. By providing teachers and instructional support personnel with quality training through the application of scientifically based reading research, to reading instruction, assessment, diagnosis, progress monitoring and intervention, reading instructional effectiveness will occur. This course will cover modules five through eight.
Module five: Fluency..
Module six: Vocabulary.
Module seven: Comprehension I.
Module eight: Comprehension II.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the ways in which diverse disciplines (e.g., history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, multiculturally, economics, ethics, law) are the basis upon which Western educational practices are built. These interconnected foundations continuously shape school characteristics and conditions including curriculum, pedagogy, classroom organization, technology and the expectations held of teachers, students, parents, administrators, and the community. Course experiences will involve prospective teachers in gaining knowledge with which to 45 analyze the effects of these educational foundations on the school experience in the past and present. Prospective teachers will use their evolving foundational framework to examine educational paradigms, theories and practices that either strengthen and expand the democratic possibilities of schooling or maintain the current correspondence between educational success and students’ socioeconomic and cultural identities.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the theories and practices of multicultural education which are presented as central to teaching and learning, not as marginal or added on to the “regular” curriculum. Study of multicultural concepts (e.g., inclusion, accurate representation, multiple perspectives, indigenous scholarship) will reveal how diverse knowledge bases have been historically muted in educational and other discourses. In order to avoid replicating this exclusionary practice, prospective and practicing teachers will explore ways in which students’ (and their own) multiple identities are embedded in teaching and learning that accurately represents diverse knowledge bases. Such an approach is multicultural and therefore emancipatory because it encourages students to become thinkers and producers of knowledge-practices that increase students’ opportunities and life chances.

Credit Hours: 3

This course defines the scope and sequence of the elementary school curriculum in the core areas of math, science and social studies and the developmental learning of students in grades Pre-K to 6. The prospective teachers will view the students learning within a constructivist framework emphasizing the knowledge and experience that they bring to the classroom and how to build on that knowledge. Prospective teachers will learn how to implement the New York State Standards or Ontario Expectations, assess student learning, and understand how technology enhances the development of student knowledge. Prospective teachers will also develop lesson plans across the curriculum which will engage learners of diverse backgrounds and needs.

Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces practicing teachers to motivation and classroom management strategies that address all students in an inclusive classroom. Teacher participants will examine motivation and classroom management strategies, and analyze and evaluate them based on the four primary categories of teaching models (the social family, the information processing family, the personal family, and the behavioral systems family). Finally, practicing teachers will implement this information in the design of a motivation and management plan for their particular classroom.

Credit Hours: 3

The intent of this course is to provide prospective teachers with a thorough knowledge of early childhood development. The course will focus on understanding research and theory as it impacts developmentally appropriate practices for infants to grade 2 students. By becoming familiar with the growth and development of young children, prospective teachers will be able to develop their own theories of children and understand their growth and development. The teaching assistantship field experience during this course will take place in an early childhood setting.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an analytical study of the physical, cognitive, social and moral transitions faced by adolescents. The course will focus on the applications of theory and research to help guide the decisions and behaviors of professionals and parents who interact with youth on a regular basis. Special emphasis will be given to the needs of the younger adolescents and their middle school experience.

Credit Hours: 3

A study of processes, conditions and techniques of the acquisition of knowledge, skills and behavioral patterns in humans. Learning theories and their applicative aspects will be considered, as will such problems as motivation, guidance, retention and forgetting, problem solving, meanings and insight, and the role of punishment and reinforcement.

Credit Hours: 3

The course is designed to introduce the prospective teacher to the theories of human learning, development and motivation and the applications of these theories in the learning environment. Each of the developmental stages of early childhood, childhood, preadolescence and adolescence will be focused upon to gain awareness of human learning, maturation and motivation. Prospective teachers will be required to participate in a school-based learn and serve field placement to experience the application of theories; observe the interaction of a child/adolescent within the school, family and peer systems; and reflect upon their learning through a case-study project.

Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces prospective and practicing teachers to the characteristics of students with physical, cognitive and emotional/behavioral challenges. The participants will be introduced to legislation issues including ADA, IDEA, IEPs, transition services, inclusion, etc. Participants will explore the role of students, family and education professionals. As part of this course, participants will reflect upon observations and interactions with students with disabilities.

Credit Hours: 3

The course examines a variety of teaching strategies using literature written for children and adolescents. Among the topics addressed are how to locate and evaluate the text and illustrations in children’s 46 books, how to integrate literature into the K-12 curriculum across multiple content areas, and how to stimulate and evaluate a variety of student responses to literature.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide participants with a deeper knowledge of how to deliver writing instruction more effectively. Participants will gain knowledge of the America’s Choice writing standards, New York state writing standards, writing genres, components of writer’s workshop, writing conferences, and how to analyze students’ writing using rubrics. Participants will review and discuss strategies to help strengthen the workshop approach in the classroom. Writing standards will be defined clearly to help guide instruction as well as to communicate with parents and other educators the expectations of each grade level’s writing program.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide practicing teachers with a foundation for literacy instruction in K–12 classrooms. Teacher participants will examine literacy in terms of its definition, the factors contributing to its development, the stages of literacy growth, and the role of literacy in enabling full societal participation. The teacher’s role in providing effective, appropriate instruction to ensure that all students reach their literacy potential will be emphasized. This will include an awareness of the New York State Learning Standards and the Ontario Expectations as guides to levels of literacy achievement. In addition, participants will examine effective instructional practices across the grade levels and explore how they can develop families as literacy partners, address diverse needs of students, use effective assessment to guide instruction, and incorporate technology into literacy instruction.

Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces practicing teachers to multiple uses of technology in literacy education. It provides them with the knowledge and experience to use technology as a tool to improve literacy teaching and learning for all students. Teachers examine and evaluate literacy software in terms of applicability to a variety of educational settings. Teachers learn to teach students how to access literacy information and resources using the Internet. Teachers also learn how to guide students in Web publishing.

Credit Hours: 3

This course presents the emergent literacy view of early reading which acknowledges children as active participants in the process of becoming literate long before formal reading and writing instruction begins. It recognizes the dynamic relation between oral and written language such that reading and writing each influence the course of development of the other. Ongoing research by the Center for the Improvement of Early Reading Achievement is presented to provide the prospective teacher with empirical foundations for sound practices to increase children’s early reading achievement. In addition, a flexible, organizational framework for establishing a balanced early literacy program will be presented as a way of thinking about the range of reading and writing activities essential for promoting early literacy. The following components of a balanced early literacy program will be examined in depth: reading aloud, shared reading, guided reading, independent reading, shared writing, interactive writing, guided writing or writing workshop, independent writing, and letter and word study.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to develop effective teachers of literacy for learners in the intermediate grades 3-6, examining both theory and practice. Practicing teachers will examine effective instructional practices that address the New York State Standards and Ontario Expectations, integration of the language arts, the diverse needs of students, the use of technology for literacy learning, and assessment.

Credit Hours: 3

The intent of this course is to provide teachers with knowledge of various assessment practices, skills in the assessment of learners with disabilities, and an understanding of the legal, moral and social issues associated with assessment in special education. The course will focus on the assessment of the following four areas: intelligence, achievement, behavior, and social-emotional well-being. Teachers will work in teams to prepare an Individualized Education Plan for a student for whom all four types of assessments have been performed.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive study of middle-level philosophy, curriculum and programming. Examination of the development of middle schools with particular attention to exemplar models will be the focus of the initial aspect of this course. A clinical component is required. Field components will be conducted in the local on-site middle schools by middle-level educators.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to help prepare teachers for modern schools by equipping them with the knowledge base, the attitudes of reflection and the skills necessary for effective decision making. The course will be structured collaboratively. Teams of learners will read, discuss and evaluate studies, design applications, and analyze effects. Case studies will provide the opportunities to apply the knowledge base. Videotape analysis of one’s own teaching and that of others will be a focus of the course.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 595

This course is designed to help prospective teachers develop the knowledge and skills to deliver literacy instruction effectively. Participants will learn how to: create a literate environment that wraps literacy around all areas of the curriculum; implement the New York State Learning Standards or Ontario Expectations following principles of effective instruction; incorporate technology into instruction; use a wide range of literature, including multicultural literature, across the curriculum; cultivate partnerships with parents to encourage and enhance literacy development; and use literacy assessments to make decisions about instruction for diverse learners.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to help practicing teachers develop greater effectiveness in teaching reading diagnostically in K- 12 classrooms, especially in individualized or small group settings. Teacher participants will examine a variety of factors that influence literacy acquisition, discuss and identify various reading problems, learn to conduct a diagnostic assessment of a student’s reading performance, analyze the assessment, and plan for appropriate reading instruction.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide participants with a deeper knowledge of how to deliver reading instruction to students with diverse learning needs. Focus will be placed on planning instruction, accessing and developing resources and conducting assessments for students from different cultural backgrounds and learning abilities.

Credit Hours: 3

This course offers the grade 7-12 teacher the opportunity to design instructional and assessment materials in reading, writing and study skills in the content subjects for his/her own classroom use. This course will sensitize the practicing teacher to the important role that reading plays in learning any subject. The course will provide a knowledge base about the reading process and opportunities to use that knowledge in instruction, assessment and program organization.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to prepare prospective teachers for teaching the language arts (reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing) in the primary/elementary classroom using an integrated approach. Prospective teachers will learn how to guide students through each stage of the reading and writing processes and how to incorporate technology into each process. They will also learn how to utilize effective practices and strategies that enable elementary students at all levels of literacy development to read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding, literary response and expression, critical analysis and evaluation, and social interaction. Emphasis is placed on making meaningful connections for students, building strong home-school connections, and using

ongoing assessment of student progress to guide instruction.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides prospective teachers with strategies for integrating the language arts (listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing visual works and constructing visual works) into the instruction of their specific content areas. Topics include techniques for teaching technical vocabulary; locating and selecting relevant sources; note taking from oral, print and electronic sources; organizing, writing, editing and revising papers; conforming to conventions of source citation and conventions of standard written English; writing informational and other types of essays; using content-area learning logs; viewing graphics and art, and creating graphics and art related to content-area concepts.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides the basic theories, issues and concepts related to teaching bilingual students in Pre-K-12 classrooms. Program models will be presented that employ bilingual education and integrated English as a Second Language (ESL) services as well as other models. Classroom strategies impacting student behavior and student learning are discussed. Current issues are discussed and provide students with opportunities to complete library research. Graduate students will complete a significant research project as part of this course. Field experience required.

Credit Hours: 3

This course takes a global approach to the promotion of literacy. Focusing on juvenile and children’s literature as well as on literature applicable to adolescents, the course will provide an in depth study of literacy beyond our national borders. Methods of teaching literacy — reading, writing, speaking, comprehending, and thinking — to ELL students will be infused in the course. Students will develop lessons, literature-teaching modules, and develop materials for use in future classroom work. Field experience required.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will present current theories of second language acquisition (SLA) as well as provide an overview of linguistic phenomena in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse analysis germane to the second language classroom. Language transfer, BICS vs. CALP, hypotheses of major theorist in the fields of SLA and linguistics will be discussed. The course will analyze fundamental concepts, such as SLA in adults and children, in formal and informal learning contexts, and in diverse sociocultural settings, and take an interdisciplinary approach, encouraging students to consider SLA from linguistic, psychological and social perspectives. The course will emphasize how to teach pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar/syntax, and discourse in an ESL classroom and allow students to apply research-based practices.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will approach sociolinguistic considerations germane to the ESL classroom from a humanities perspective. After reviewing models of first and second language acquisition, this course will discuss sociolinguistic phenomena such as code switching, dialects and idiolects, language transfer, loan words, and appropriate discourse. Students will apply theoretical models to ESL classroom practice through research and projects.

Credit Hours: 3

(Middle Childhood, Early Childhood, Literacy, Special Education, Counseling, School Psychology or Administration) This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the principles of research in education. Students will become effective consumers of educational research by analyzing the literature in a particular area of study and synthesizing the results into material that can be applied to diverse educational settings. Students will also develop practical research skills that they might use to assist them in their own professional development. Pre-service teachers and practitioners enrolled in this course will complete a field-based research project pertaining to their area of study.

Credit Hours: 3

This introductory offering has as its major focus the many administrative uses of the computer in the field of education. A major goal is to ensure that every graduate student in educational administration has a comprehensive understanding of current and future roles that computer technology creates for the school system, of the use of the computer in short- and long-term planning, and of the impact that computers can and will have on administrative duties and responsibilities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ability of the administrator to utilize computer technologies at the district, school and classroom levels. A range of administrative uses will be presented to ensure sound computer administrative practices.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to offer teachers and administrators the opportunity to use and to implement the many forms of technology in delivering curriculum and instructional content to their students. Using the many models and technology tools, (i.e., hardware and software, graphics, hypermedia) allows classroom teachers the opportunity to frame their curriculum program for instant educational retrieval and to make the course content available for its immediate use.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to prepare future school building and school district leaders with the knowledge of theory and research in school improvement and the analysis of school and district data for decision making. Techniques for examining data and decision making for student achievement will be reviewed. Current technology resources useful in the school improvement process or the district management process will be demonstrated. Collection and analysis of school data will be integrated into the current themes in the educational process. The action research process as it applies to school indicators of student success will also be addressed.

Credit Hours: 3

An exploration of general and specific directives relative to thesis direction; research, format, and composition; personal guidance provided by one’s director through regular meetings.

Credit Hours: 6   /   Prerequisites: EDU 595

This individual study is directed toward students who are interested in conducting a major research project, and preparing and defending a thesis proposal. The approval of the department chair, the dean and the adviser is required.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 595

This individual study is designed for students who have completed EDU 607 successfully. Through EDU 608 students complete and defend the thesis. The approval of the department chair, the dean and the adviser is required.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 607

This course focuses on assessment for all candidates enrolled in the administration and supervision program. It is one of the first courses taken. The theories learned will be applied through the use of individual assessment (i.e., analysis of video tapes, case studies, article critiques, role-playing and self-assessment critiques). Major concepts that will be analyzed include leadership, decision making/ problem solving and professional fitness. This course is designed not only to assess the candidate’s acquisition of administrative attributes and skills, but to understand the situational influences that may affect one’s leadership style.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to promote an increased understanding of group dynamics and to develop specific skills and positive attitudes toward the use of group procedures.

Credit Hours: 3

This graduate course is designed to provide graduate students in the mental health counseling program and other graduate programs practical education and experience in professional mediation and conflict resolution. While this course has a generalist focus, topics such as family mediation, divorce mediation, victim-offender mediation, mediation between organizations, cultural groups, etc. will also be covered.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the development, establishment, and monitoring of educational policies in New York state. In examining these policies, the political framework in which educational policy and practice occurs is addressed. Students will be expected to read and understand recent policy documents as approved by the State Education Department and Board of Regents. In addition, written assignments will include a research paper on a specific educational issue and the preparation of a grant to solve a particular educational issue or problem.

Credit Hours: 3

As leaders deal with the issue of effecting dynamic change, they will need to consider four strategies: 1) training and support for staff; 2) realigning formal roles and relationships; 3) establishing collaborative cultures; and 4) providing transition rituals. Addressing these strategies is the focus of the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Superintendents function in a challenging environment. With school closings, instructional changes, state standards, safety concerns, budget gaps, personnel considerations, community expectations and other issues facing them each day, they are often caught in the center of a societal debate. This course will examine the various roles and responsibilities of the school superintendent. The necessary relationships with the board of education, various community groups, school staff, students and other constituencies will be discussed and analyzed, including the importance of those relationships during these times of educational changes.

Credit Hours: 3

In this course, leadership theory will be applied through the use of individual assessment instruments, i.e., analysis of video tapes, case studies, article critiques, role playing and self-assessment critiques. The importance of style of leadership and influences that effect style will be emphasized. Other major concepts will be analyzed utilizing the NU Leadership Matrix model. These concepts include the attributes and skills to facilitate the leadership process for managing a school building organization. The focus of this analysis is to help to assess the candidate’s acquisition of administrative attributes and skills in the context of school leadership.

Credit Hours: 3

The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the role of the local, state and federal government in the financing of public education. Various programs for state aid and equalization will be discussed. Students will receive instruction through class and field experiences in the following competencies: basic accounting procedures, auditing reports, and the budget, including budget calendar and the actual steps in building a budget.

Credit Hours: 3

The course is designed to assist students in an understanding of the operation, financing, and reporting procedures of the following business functions: insurance, cafeteria, transportation, investments, various school accounts, purchasing, inventory, and maintenance.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide the student with an understanding of public school law through an examination of federal and state laws affecting public and private schools in the United States.

Credit Hours: 3

A study of the Education Act and the regulations which govern the schools of Ontario. The history of school law will be studied. Various beliefs, reports, and court cases which have resulted in changes in the law will be examined.

Credit Hours: 3

This is a course for administrators, principals, supervisors and those preparing for such positions. It is expected that the student will have competencies to deal extensively with major problems and issues confronting the profession such as recruitment, preparation, certification, salaries and salary schedules, collective bargaining, ethics, teacher selection, assignment and load, induction, legal provisions, inservice education, morale, legal rights, tenure and retirement of staff.

Credit Hours: 3

The course will consider social structures operating within a community. Principles and techniques of working with school personnel, organizations and members of the community will be the focus of the course with a view to promoting better public relations.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a seminar study for candidates seeking certification as school building or school district leader in New York state. The seminar will focus on a single concept in leadership which is current in the field and not addressed in depth in other educational leadership courses. The topic of the seminar will be determined by the educational leadership department.

Credit Hours: 3

This offering orients the individual to the functions and major principles of instructional supervision. Attention is devoted to the critical examination of current research and publications about effective supervisory behavior. Models for clinical supervision are introduced and emphasized within the framework of improving teaching performance and its impact on student achievement. Appropriate strategies for developing and implementing supervisory programs are stressed.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to give the participants a background in the plan, design, implementation, and evaluation of various curriculum and educational programs.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to survey the major functions and principles of instructional supervision and curriculum design. A review of current research, theory and literature in both areas will be addressed. Specific models of supervision will be reviewed in the context of district programs and planning. In addition, the course will provide a review of processes applicable to the planning, design, implementation and evaluation of curriculum and educational programs.

Credit Hours: 3

The capstone course is an interdisciplinary approach to concepts of leadership as they relate to the school administrator. The course includes a comprehensive survey of studies and readings relative to models, styles, behaviors and problems in educational leadership. The course includes the study of motivation, job satisfaction, decision making, ethical professional behavior and the role of an educational leader as change agent and innovator in a changing society. A major focus of the course is the development of a school reform plan for a building.

Credit Hours: 3

This course assesses acquired administrative skills and is one of the last to be completed in the certification program for the school district leader. The assessment component will incorporate authentic performance approaches, including written analysis, work-sample products, focused responses, oral responses, simulations and a portfolio. As a requirement for the portfolio, the student will be expected to assemble evidence of various specified experiences and expectations from previous courses. A major focus of the course is to develop a plan of action for a school district reform. The role of the urban superintendent will be emphasized throughout this process.

Credit Hours: 3

This course explores the basic counseling process, including developing active listening skills, building rapport and facilitating client awareness. The course will also examine the settings in which a professional counselor can practice, such as schools, community and mental health agencies, career counseling centers, rehabilitation programs, and addiction programs. Professional roles, ethical standards and professional credentialing will be introduced in this course.

Credit Hours: 3

As an introduction to the issues which arise in counseling multicultural and diverse populations, this course will focus upon understanding the differences and similarities in values, goals and challenges of individuals from diverse backgrounds. Personal exploration into attitudes and behaviors toward others from different backgrounds will be emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will examine the various theoretical perspectives and techniques in the field of counseling. Through application of various counseling theories to the analysis of case studies and personal growth challenges, the student will begin to develop a personal style of counseling.

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines the theories of development from psychology, biology, sociology and cultural anthropology. Emphasis is placed on understanding how normal and abnormal behavior develops. Through learning about the developmental milestones and crises in the human experience, the counselor will develop skills to plan effective intervention strategies.

Credit Hours: 3

Fundamentals of educational/psychological tests. This course also examines foundational principles of standardized testing and assessment.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice the various counseling strategies and techniques learned in previous courses. Focus will be on developing the skills necessary to select the counseling intervention methods most appropriate for the specific life challenges facing the client(s).

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654

This course will introduce the student to the counseling experience as an active participant. This personal growth experience will utilize the programs and services of the NU counseling center with primary focus on the personal wellness process.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to develop a philosophy of guidance activities with emphasis on the major services, plans of organizing them, school personnel needed and their functions, continual growth of the services, and the evaluation of the effectiveness of the program.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to give professionals knowledge and behavior skills which are applicable to face-to-face communication; one’s own unique style of communicating; group and organizational factors which affect communications; and continued improvement of one’s own communication skills.

Credit Hours: 3

This course critically examines the factors involved in career development including intellectual ability, aptitudes, personality, interests, and environmental influences. The value of theories of career development and what theories can be used to understand career development are also stressed.

Credit Hours: 3

Understanding the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – IV will be the focus of this course. Some prior knowledge of the etiology of behavioral disorders and the impact of these disorders upon society is assumed. Developing differential diagnostic skills through the analysis of case studies will be emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 655

The theoretical perspectives guiding counselors will be examined. Exploration of personal family dynamics through the use of different theories will facilitate the student’s awareness of various family system models. Beginning skills in family intervention will be developed through role-playing, small interaction groups and case studies.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 658, EDU 654, EDU 617

This course examines the various counseling theories applicable to group counseling. Through an experimental mode of learning, the student will develop beginning skills for facilitating groups and in planning intervention strategies.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654, EDU 658, EDU 617

Students will develop advanced skills in diagnosis through integrating material for the intake, initial interview, social histories, and psychiatric/psychological reports. In addition, they will develop the crucial skills in client care/management including creating and implementing appropriate treatment programs, writing reports, keeping records and consulting with all professionals in the total managed care system.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 655, EDU 657

This course is an overview of the field of pharmacology. Physiological effects, psychological effects, withdrawal characteristics, drug interactions and treatment applications are the focus of the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Examination of the psychological, sociological and biological reasons for addictions will lead to understanding the models for treating addictions. One focus of the course is on recognizing physical, behavioral, emotional, social and spiritual symptoms of chemical dependence and other addictions. Another focus is on learning the counseling and treatment methods commonly used in treating the chemically dependent and addicted.

Credit Hours: 3

By examining the models of consultation as they apply to the counselor, the student will develop an awareness of the issues in the process of consultation. Through role-playing, analysis of case studies and personal exploration, the student will begin to develop effective consultation skills.

Credit Hours: 3

The counseling field experience is a school-based work experience in guidance activities. Under the supervision of a certified, qualified school counselor, the student will be involved in all aspects of the guidance program. This course is mandatory and will precede EDU 677. On-campus seminars will be held for the sharing and discussion of experiences and for further supervision by the Niagara University instructor.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654, EDU 658

The counseling practicum is a school-based experience in counseling. The major emphasis is on the counseling situation in an individual or group setting. The student will be supervised both by a certified counselor and by the university instructor. Feedback will be provided on techniques, application of theory and counseling styles. On-campus seminars and individual supervision will be held to share experiences and for further supervision by the university instructor.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654, EDU 658, EDU 676

The advanced practicum is designed for those students completing requirements for the certificate of advanced studies in school counseling. This course will be conducted on an individual basis under the supervision of a university instructor. By prior arrangement, students will study/ practice particular aspects of the counseling process they want to further explore.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 676, EDU 677

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to mental health practice in preparation for the subsequent counseling internships (EDU 685, 686, 687). Students will be placed in a counseling setting for 100 clock hours, and will have weekly individual supervision as well as biweekly seminars/group supervision.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 651, EDU 654, EDU 658

The historical roots of modern rehabilitation including the major vocational rehabilitation acts and subsequent amendments will be examined. Developing awareness of the philosophical and theoretical frameworks for evaluation and treatment will be emphasized. Understanding the role and function of the rehabilitation counselor will be the major focus of the course.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual study consists of individual readings, study and work on a research project, field study, or an educational problem related to the student’s area of concentration and/or a course within that concentration. It may also be related to one’s major teaching, administrative and counseling field. The approval of the departmental chairperson, the dean, and the adviser is required.

Credit Hours: 3

Each candidate’s prior acquired knowledge from program courses and applied field experiences in the educational research program will provide the base for research study, application and writing for this course. Candidates will work with a graduate professor on an individual basis. Candidates will study advanced research concepts, processes and approaches including the concomitant statistical techniques and procedures necessary to bring an investigation to a successful completion and subsequent publication.

Credit Hours: 3

Students will be placed in mental health settings consistent with their personal goals for growth in the field of mental health. Each internship experience will be uniquely designed to meet the needs of each individual student. Basic commonalties across internships include 300 clock hours on site for each internship (total 900 clock hours); 80 hours of direct service with clients for each internship (total 240); a minimum of one hour per week of individual supervision throughout all internships and biweekly seminars/group supervision of three hours in length throughout the internships.

Credit Hours: 9   /   Prerequisites: EDU 679, EDU 651, EDU 654, EDU 658

This course will examine various religious education theories and evaluate those theories in the light of the Catholic separate school system. Attention will be focused on the insights of Scripture and sacramental theology, and how these insights are incorporated into the Canadian religious education program. This can be used for equivalency for Religious Education Part I, jointly issued by the Ministry of Education and O.E.C.T.A./O.S.S.T.A.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides the internship experience requirement for the advanced study educational leadership program for school building leader. Candidates will complete 600 internship hours. Approximately half of the hours are embedded in course activities completed throughout the program. EDU 691 is the culminating, intensive internship for the school building leader certification. The internship experiences are aligned with the program standards from Educational Leadership Constituent Council.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides the internship experience requirement for the advanced study educational leadership program for school district leader. Candidates will complete 600 internship hours. Approximately half of the hours are embedded in course activities completed throughout the program. EDU 692 is the culminating, intensive internship for the school building leader certification. The course includes seminar sessions throughout the internship. The internship experiences are aligned with the program standards from Educational Leadership Constituent Council.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides the internship experience requirement for the educational leadership master’s program for school building leader and school district leader. Candidates will complete 600 internship hours. In addition to hours embedded in courses completed throughout the program, a culminating, intensive internship for the school building leader and school district leader certification is required. The course includes seminar sessions throughout the internship. The internship experiences are aligned with the program standards from Educational Leadership Constituent Council.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides the first half of the internship experience requirement for the master’s program in Ontario. Candidates will complete 300 internship hours. The course includes seminar sessions throughout the internship. The internship experiences are aligned with the program standards from Educational Leadership Constituent Council.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides the second half of the internship experience requirement for the master’s program in Ontario. Candidates will complete 300 internship hours. The course includes seminar sessions throughout the internship. The internship experiences are aligned with the program standards from Educational Leadership Constituent Council.

Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an overview of ways technology can be used to facilitate the education of learners with disabilities. It also offers advance study of various technological devices that assist individuals with disabilities in performing functional tasks and achieving independence. The course emphasizes the integration of assistive technology into the home, community, school, and workplace. The course also provides opportunities in the use of software such as word processing, database management, graphics, and electronic spreadsheet to enhance the personal productivity of special educators.

Credit Hours: 3

The course examines divergent perspectives on critical issues or questions in the field of special education. The course is designed to enhance reflective thought on current topics in special education including, but not limited to: inclusion, collaborative and consulting teacher models, technology, legal aspects of special education including revisions to the IDEA Act, the IEP, dual diagnosis, transition services, and noncategorical approaches to teaching.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to assist novice teachers as they develop within their profession. Teachers enrolling in this course must have a current teaching position within a school district participating in the Foundations of Teaching Program Partnership, and must be simultaneously registered for EDU 743- 744. As part of the course, novice teachers will work with a mentor teacher in their home district who is certified in their subject area, and will demonstrate their development in the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards for their initial certification area (elementary or secondary subject areas). Portfolios will be developed evidencing the candidate’s professional achievement in the initial certification area, including subject area content, learning standards and curriculum, instructional resources for specific content areas (including instructional technology), and assessments that are discipline-specific, with the professional goal of helping all students learn.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to assist novice teachers develop within their profession. Teachers enrolled in this course must have a current teaching position within a school district participating in the Foundations of Teaching Program Partnership and must be simultaneously registered for EDU 741-742. An education faculty member and arts and sciences faculty members will teach the course jointly. Participants will reflect and evaluate their effectiveness in teaching the New York State Learning Standards, with a focus on linking content and pedagogy for all learners.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide candidates with the various theories, principles and practical applications of behavioral strategies as they relate to the diverse nature of students that represent schools today. Specific techniques drawn from various theories and principles will provide a framework for exploration, discussion and analysis. Candidates will be required to observe and analyze both student and teacher behaviors within the classroom. Based upon the observation, classroom and/or individual behavior management plans will be developed.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to focus on a cross-categorical model for providing services to individuals with a variety of disabilities, behavioral disorders and physical impairments. Curricula and instructional methodologies relevant to support students with diverse needs in the least restrictive environment are covered. Through field work and projects, the needs of individuals with moderate/severe disabilities and their families will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide candidates with advanced knowledge and application of consultation as a service delivery model for students with diverse needs and the application of collaboration as a framework for working in inclusive settings. The course focuses on pedagogical theories, skills for consultation and collaboration through field work and best practices for working as an effective educational consultant and collaborator.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with a comprehensive study of early childhood educational philosophy, curriculum and programming. Exemplary early childhood education 54 models will be examined, including the practices of multiage teaching, Montessori schooling, and integrated curricula. The teaching assistantship field experience during this course will take place in a early childhood educational setting.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide the prospective teacher with a comprehensive study of middle childhood educational philosophy, curriculum and programming. Exemplary middle school education models will be examined, including the practices of teaming, cooperative learning, and integrated curricula. The teaching assistantship field experience during this course will take place in a middle childhood educational setting.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for curriculum development, planning, classroom management, and student assessment within the academic subject area of their teaching certificate. The participants will develop lesson plans aligned with the New York State Standards and Ontario Expectations using a variety of teaching strategies to engage students of diverse backgrounds and needs. Portfolio entries will continue to evolve as prospective teachers evidence their growth in developing lesson plans within a specified academic subject area. A 50-hour practicum in a secondary subject area is an integral component of this course.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is to be taken concurrently with EDU 760 providing the prospective teacher with experiences that combine general teaching strategies with components of special subject methods and field experiences. Each course deals with the concerns of its own particular academic area (for example, laboratories in science, values issues in social studies) and the general issues of technology, grade-level curricular specificity, classroom management, multicultural content and the construction of tests and other assessments. Students’ portfolio entries will evidence their growth in developing lesson plans with a variety of teaching strategies specific to the content area.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide the prospective teachers with knowledge and skills for curriculum development and planning, classroom management, and student assessment. The participants will develop lesson plans aligned with the New York State Standards and Ontario Expectations using a variety of teaching strategies to engage students of diverse backgrounds and needs. Portfolio entries will continue to evolve as prospective teachers evidence their growth in developing lesson plans. A 50-hour practicum is an integral part of this course.

Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to guide practicing teachers through the exploration of recent special education research and teaching practices. Participants will become familiar with specific issues including the use of assistive and adaptive technology, curriculum adaptation and individualization, IEP development and implementation, and collaboration among family and related service professionals for children with special needs. Teachers in this course must complete field work in an elementary special education setting.

Credit Hours: 3

The course provides practicing teachers with the opportunity to modify the secondary curriculum to meet the needs of students with physical, cognitive and emotional/ behavioral challenges as outlined in the New York State Learning Standards. Focus will be on the development of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and its implementation. Teachers will create appropriate modifications and transition plans through the use of a variety of teaching strategies including technology and cooperative learning. Teachers in this course must complete field work in a secondary special education setting.

Credit Hours: 3

This field experience is designed to enable teacher candidates to develop competence in teaching secondary school age students in the secondary education classroom. Teacher candidates are expected to demonstrate attitudes, knowledge and skills essential to effective teaching consistent with New York Learning Standards and Ontario Expectations. Teacher candidates will develop their final showcase portfolio throughout the semester in conjunction with the professional seminar. Student teachers are supervised by an experienced cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. — six

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 790

This field experience is designed to enable teacher candidates to develop competence in teaching elementary school age students in the elementary classroom. Teacher candidates are expected to demonstrate attitudes, knowledge and skills essential to effective teaching consistent with New York Learning Standards and Ontario expectations. Teacher candidates will develop their final showcase portfolio throughout the semester in conjunction with the professional seminar. Student teachers are supervised by an experienced cooperating teacher and the university supervisor.

Credit Hours: 6   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 791

This course is designed to provide the teacher candidate with knowledge and understanding of those competencies that are essential to successful teaching. The seminar focuses upon the student teacher’s professional role as a classroom practitioner. In addition, responsibilities for classroom organization and management and the development of multiculturally sensitive and gender equitable classrooms; attitudes toward teaching, learning, and assessment; knowledge of ethics and a basic understanding of school systems and community characteristics are considered.

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 781-786

This course is designed to provide the teacher candidate with knowledge and understanding of those competencies that are essential to successful teaching. The seminar focuses upon the student teacher’s professional role as a classroom practitioner. In addition, responsibilities for classroom organization and management and the development of multiculturally sensitive and gender equitable classrooms; attitudes toward teaching, learning, and assessment; knowledge of ethics and a basic understanding of school systems and community characteristics are considered.

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 787

This seminar is designed to enable practicing teachers to analyze and evaluate the teaching of students with special needs. Practicing teachers will reflect on their teaching practices as they perform the activities of a special education teacher in inclusion situations. Practicing teachers are expected to demonstrate attitudes, knowledge and skills commensurate with effective, reflective teaching in multiculturally sensitive and gender equitable classrooms.

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 795

This course is designed to enable the practicing teacher to develop competence in teaching students with special needs. Practicing teachers will be observed by university-designated supervisors as they perform the activities of a special education teacher in inclusion, self-contained and consultant contexts. Practicing teachers are expected to demonstrate attitudes, knowledge and skills commensurate with effective teaching for all students.

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 794

The literacy practicum is designed to enable practicing teachers to develop and demonstrate competence in teaching literacy. Candidates are expected to demonstrate the attitudes, knowledge and skills commensurate with effective literacy instruction. Candidates will be observed by university-designated supervisors as they perform the activities of a reading teacher in a variety of contexts.

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 798

This course discusses advanced topics in literacy instruction, including the connection of theory and practice as related to effective instructional practices that address the New York State Standards and Ontario Expectations in literacy, the diverse literacy needs of students, the use of technology in the literacy classroom, and literacy assessment.

Credit Hours: 3   /  Taken concurrently with EDU 796.

This course is designed to assist candidates in the advanced graduate programs in the College of Education as they develop their comprehensive portfolios that evidence the knowledge, skills, and dispositions recognized by the highest national and international professional organizations within their program areas. The course will explore the general and specific directives of portfolio preparation including format and composition. Personal guidance will be provided by the instructor through regular meetings.

Credit Hours: 1

This lab/seminar course provides students with a framework for understanding the historical development and theoretical underpinnings of intelligence assessment. To adequately prepare professionals, exposure is given to a broad range of topics such as controversies in the field of assessment, individual differences, culturally and linguistically diverse populations, measurement constructs, ethics, and the complex relationship of genetic and environmental influences on human intelligence. Through lab experience and actual case studies, students will benefit from hands-on experience with state-of-the-art assessment instrumentation.

Credit Hours: 3

This seminar course provides students with a framework for understanding the development of school psychology as a specialty within the field of psychology. The focus will be on examining the role and function of the school psychologist, legal and ethical issues in the practice of school psychology, and current and future trends in service delivery.

Credit Hours: 3

This lab/seminar course provides students with a framework for understanding the complex set of challenges in assessing the strengths and needs of children and adolescents who have or are at risk for disabilities. Exposure is given to a broad range of assessment instrumentation and topics. Through lab experiences and actual case studies, students will benefit from hands-on experience with state-of-the-art assessment instrumentation and innovative approaches in assessing skills and abilities of children and adolescents.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800

This lab/seminar course is designed to give students the opportunity to practice the various counseling strategies and techniques learned in previous courses and to refine the skills and knowledge base specific to counseling with child and adolescent populations. The focus will be on learning the research and developing the skills necessary to select the counseling intervention methods most appropriate for the specific life challenges facing school-age children.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 654

This lab/seminar course provides candidates with a framework for understanding the complex set of challenges in working with infants, toddlers and preschoolers who have or are at risk for disabilities. To adequately prepare professionals entering the field of early intervention services, exposure is given to a broad range of topics such as normative and exceptional child development, the history of and new theoretical orientations in psychoeducational assessment, legislative and programmatic issues related to early intervention, and an overview of the multiple settings in which very young children interactively develop. Through lab experience and actual case studies, candidates will benefit from hands-on experience with state-of-the-art assessment instrumentation and innovative approaches in assessing skills and abilities of young children.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800, EDU 802

These courses are designed to provide candidates with an introduction to school psychology practice in preparation for the subsequent counseling internships (EDU 807 and EDU 808). Candidates will be placed in a school setting for a minimum total of 400 clock hours, of which at least 150 hours are to be direct service experience. Candidates will have at least one hour equivalent weekly individual supervision as well as biweekly seminars/group supervision.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 800, EDU 801, EDU 802, EDU 803, EDU 804

Students will be placed in school/ therapeutic settings consistent with their personal goals for growth in the field of school psychology. Each internship experience will be uniquely designed to met the needs of each individual student. Basic commonalities across internships include a total of 1200 clock hours on site for the two-semester internship, 450 hours of which must be hours of direct service with students and their families. A minimum of two hours per week of on-site, individual supervision and biweekly seminars/group supervision of three hours in length will be provided throughout the internships.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: EDU 805, EDU 806