Courses

An overview of the design and functioning of the criminal justice system in the United States. The nature and extent of crime, criminal procedure, the constitutional basis for due process, principles of the criminal law, and the agencies of criminal justice will be examined.

(Major requirement)

Credit Hours: 3

Historical and contemporary perspectives on the causes of crime and deviance in society and the treatment of offenders. Major social, psychological, and economic theories will be assessed. Nonbehavioral science perspectives will also be examined.

(Major requirement; concentration: criminology)

Credit Hours: 3

Examines philosophy and administration of the juvenile justice system. Incorporates social science research and case law to understand the system.

Focus devoted to: (1) history of juvenile justice, (2) theoretical explanations of juvenile delinquency, (3) family, school and cultural influences on juvenile behavior, and (4) interventions for juvenile offenders.

(Major requirement)

Credit Hours: 3

The history and state-of-the-art process in evaluating the police role in  the community in attempting to balance peace, order and individual rights. Influential theoretical and empirical studies of police discretion, attitudes and corruption will be examined. Other topics include the effect of Supreme Court decisions on police practices, evaluating  police performance and policewomen.

(Major requirement; concentration: law enforcement)

Credit Hours: 3

Examines criminal punishment as a social and political institution. Critically examines prominent philosophical justifications for criminal punishment, its guiding principles and its implications for contemporary policy. Explores related principles such as equality, rights, proportionality and moral desert.

(Major requirement; concentration: law adjudication)

Credit Hours: 3

Examines the prison within a social, political and economic context as well as its place within contemporary crime control debates. Explores the nature of the prison environment, including the prison subculture, violence and its management, correctional officers and the prospects for reform. Critically evaluates the impact of imprisonment on prisoners and their post-release adjustment, families and communities.

(Major requirement; concentration: penology)

Credit Hours: 3

This class will examine urban crime problems by focusing on and explaining the nature and prevalence of street-level criminals offending in some urban communities. The class will look closely at the day to day lives of street offenders and examine the motivations and thought processes that cause individuals to engage in street crime. It will closely examine crimes like robbery, street-level drug dealing, and various forms of street violence.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will provide an overview of celebrated criminal cases that received significant mass media coverage. These cases influenced public perceptions of crime and raised important justice debates. Their cultural impact on the criminal justice system and procedures will be examined as will significant United States Supreme Court Cases relating to these cases.

Credit Hours: 3

The nature, extent and impact of illicit behavior on the part of corporations, organizations, government agencies and employees. The causes, enforcement, prosecution, sentencing and prevention of organized criminal behavior will be examined. Political, white-collar, organized and corporate crime are assessed.

(Concentration: criminology)

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of the design, functioning and legal basis for systems of criminal justice in other countries. An attempt will be made to relate governmental, political, demographic and economic factors in explaining past and current trends in the adjudication of offenders. Cross-cultural analysis of the causes of crime.

(Concentration: criminology)

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of the history of drug use and abuse, the nation’s current drug policy and issues relative to the prevalence of drugs in society, the effects on the body, current law enforcement practices and the prospects for rehabilitation and prevention of drug abuse.

(Concentration: law enforcement)

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of the techniques used by forensic anthropologists in the identification, recovery and interpretation of human skeletal remains within medico-legal contexts. Topics include basic anatomy and development of bone and teeth, methods for description and identification of human remains, forensic case studies and lab activities to illustrate methods.

Credit Hours: 3

The history and present status of private law enforcement in the United States. Assessment of the need for policing in the private sector and a review of the causes and effectiveness of control procedures for employee theft, shoplifting, commercial burglary and other crimes. The legal powers and restrictions of private law enforcement will be examined.

(Concentration: law enforcement)

Credit Hours: 3

This course examines forensic accounting and economic crime, integrating accounting, criminal justice and computer and information systems concepts and issues. The course includes limited accounting theory and concentrates on financial fraud, white-collar crime, how financial fraud is perpetrated, approaches to fraud investigation and documentation, and fraud detection and prevention. (concentration: law enforcement).

Credit Hours: 3

Course studies the social construction of serial killers as a cultural and criminal justice phenomenon. It examines empirical research on typologies and applies criminological theories to explain motivations and onset, prevalence and persistence of serial homicide. Also studies and critiques criminal justice responses to serial killers including investigation techniques such as profiling.

An examination of the constitutional rules and principles that help shape the law of substantive criminal law. Some of the issues covered include sources of criminal law, due process, equal protection, freedom of speech, right to privacy, cruel and unusual punishments, actus rea, mens rea, omissions, causations, attempts, legal and  factual impossibility, self defense, battered wife syndrome, necessity defense, and the insanity defense. Attention will be given to U.S. Supreme Court and state court decisions that interpret and apply federal and state constitutional provisions to these issues.

(Concentration: law adjudication)

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of the constitutional rules and principles that help shape the law of criminal procedure. The issues covered include pre-trial rights and proceedings, the adversarial system, the right against compelled self-incrimination, and search and seizure. Attention is given to U.S. Supreme Court decisions that interpret and apply federal constitutional provisions to these issues.

(Concentration: Law adjudication)

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of criminal investigation to understand of how and why they are conducted. Emphasizes crime scenes, evidence, search and seizure, interviewing and interrogating individuals, and suspect identification. Their application to the investigation of deaths, assaults property crime, and white-collar crime will be studied.

Credit Hours: 3

An examination of the history, philosophy and functioning of community-based correctional programs. Each of the various types of programs, including probation and parole, will be discussed and evaluated. The legal rights of ex-offenders.

(Concentration: penology)

Credit Hours: 3

The historical, philosophical and legal basis for criminal sentencing. Judicial discretion, disparity, indeterminate and determinate sentences, mandatory sentencing, parole procedures and current legal provisions will be examined.

(Concentration: penology)

Credit Hours: 3

The application of accumulated knowledge in criminology and criminal justice in a field setting. Students will be placed in a criminal justice agency and complete an internship under the supervision of a faculty member.

(Concentration: advised elective)

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: permission of instructor

An opportunity for students to design and execute a research or evaluation project in an area of particular interest. Selection of topics, research plan and methods used are left up to the student under the supervision of a faculty member.

(Concentration: advised elective)

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Seminar examines an issue affecting society and its relationship to the criminal justice system. Topics might include a discussion of ethics and the criminal justice system, computerized information systems and the criminal justice system, intimate and stranger crimes, or the criminal justice system in the future. (Concentration: criminology, law enforcement, law adjudication or penology).

Credit Hours: 3

Experimental and quasi-experimental designs in criminological applications. Sampling, reliability, validity, causality and other topics will be presented and analyzed. The pros and cons of quantitative research design and measurement.

(Major requirement)

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. they research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 6

Students will participate in a seminar class designed to instruct the student on the completion of policy analysis projects that demonstrate a synthesis if accumulated knowledge. These projects will involve an evaluation or test of a research question affecting the criminal justice system.

Credit Hours: 3