Courses

An examination of chemistry through the substances that impact our lives. This course is intended for anyone seeking to become a better informed citizen of our technological society. This course is reserved for students who have no prior college-level chemistry experience.

Credit Hours: 3

A beginning course in chemistry designed to present fundamental principles of chemical theory in the context of inorganic and some organic chemistry. This course is reserved for students who have no prior college-level chemistry experience.

Credit Hours: 3

A qualitative, nonlaboratory course to relate students to their chemical environment. Classes will include discussions on present problems involving air and water pollution, energy, nuclear material and waste disposal. This course is reserved for students who have no prior  college-level chemistry experience

Credit Hours: 3

A qualitative, nonlaboratory course that will present many popular consumer items in a chemical context. Topics will include polymers, fibers, detergents, agricultural chemicals, food, food additives and over-the-counter medication. This course is reserved for students who have no prior college-level chemistry experience.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters

This course introduces the nonscience major to chemical and scientific concepts through a study of foods and food-related processes. No previous scientific training is expected. The student should also gain from the course a greater appreciation of why things are done in certain ways, while learning that some practices have absolutely no scientific basis. This course is reserved for students who have no prior college-level chemistry experience.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters

A presentation of scientific and chemical principles in the context of forensic science, the application of science to law. This course is reserved for students who have no prior college-level chemistry experience.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters

The world around us, including our own bodies, is really just a bunch of chemicals. We use them everyday withour realizing it. This course will look at some of the more common uses of chemistry in our everyday lives, including food, vitamins, weight control, drugs, crime, etc.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters

An introduction to physical and chemical principles appropriate for declared and potential science majors. Topics include stoichiometry, nuclear and electronic structure, bonding and thermochemistry.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semesters

This course continues the exposition of chemical principles necessary for further study in the chemical and biological sciences. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, and electrochemistry as well as a periodic survey of the physical and chemical properties of the elements.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 111

A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHE 111.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in fall semesters

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 112.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 113L

A one-semester course for those not majoring in chemistry, but whose main interest — biology, bioinformatics — requires some knowledge of organic chemistry.

Credit Hours: 4   /  offered in fall semesters

This first half of the two-semester sequence deals mainly with bonding and structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature and the chemistry of hydrocarbons. A survey of the most important functional groups is presented. Understanding why and how reactions take place is emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semesters

The second half of this two-semester sequence covers the extensive chemistry of the major functional groups. Synthesis and spectroscopic structure determination become key areas of interest. A unifying mechanistic approach continues to bring understanding of how reactions occur.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 221

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 221.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in fall semesters

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 222.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 223L

The study of the theory and practice of common analytical methods. Topics to be covered include volumetric and gravimetric methods of analysis, potentiometric methods, and spectrophotometric techniques. The emphasis will be on gaining an appreciation of the total analytical process and its application to actual analyses.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 112

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 227.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 114L

A one-semester course in the basic principles of physical chemistry. This course is designed for those not majoring in chemistry, but whose main interest — biology, bioinformatics — requires some knowledge of physical chemistry.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE112, MAT112

This course is designed for students to learn the techniques of separation (column chromatography, Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC), High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Gas- Chromatography (GC)) followed by characterization of molecules using spectroscopic techniques (Mass Spectrometry (MS), Infra-red Spectrometry (IR), Ultra-Violet Visible Spectrometry (UV-Vis), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)). An emphasis is placed on the isolation and structural elucidation of organic molecules.

Credit Hours: 3

This course will focus on the fundamentals of medicinal chemistry, drug design, and application. Topics covered will include structureactivity relationships, pharmacokinetics (what the body does to drugs), pharmacodynamics (what drugs do to the body), and computational approaches to drug analysis. Several classifications of drugs and their impact on human health and society will also be presented.

Credit Hours: 3

The first in a three-semester sequence that surveys the physical and mathematical foundations of chemical science. In this course the principles of thermodynamics and dynamics are emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 227, CHE 229L, MAT 112, PHY 122; CHE 333L

The second in a three-semester sequence that surveys the physical and mathematical foundations of chemical science. In this course the fundamental concepts of statistical thermodynamics and quantum mechanics are emphasized. Connections between the mathematical formalism of physical chemistry and the macroscopic and spectroscopic properties of matter will be drawn.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 331; CHE 334L

This is the laboratory designed to be taken concurrently with CHE 331. The experiments performed in this laboratory course complement material studied in CHE 331. This laboratory requires the use of modern computer platforms and software for data analysis.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in fall semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 331

This is the laboratory designed to be taken concurrently with CHE 332. The experiments performed in this laboratory course complement material studied in CHE 332. This laboratory builds on techniques learned in CHE 333L. There will be a greater emphasis on computer methodologies to explore the theoretical models of physical chemistry.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 333L; CHE 332

One-semester course which rigorously examines the three major areas of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis — spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on theory, instrumentation, operation, and application of each technique.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 227, CHE 331

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 338.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in fall semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 229L, CHE 333L

An introduction to biochemistry on an advanced level. The first course in the two-semester sequence covers the classes of compounds found in the cell. Enrollment in this course is restricted to students with junior or senior status.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 222

The second semester of the biochemistry sequence. This course covers metabolic pathways and those processes essential to the living cell.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 345

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 345.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in fall semesters

A laboratory course intended to be taken concurrently with CHE 346.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 347L

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student's major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 6   /  CHE 403 offered in fall semesters; CHE 404 offered in spring semesters

A survey of physical chemistry in biochemistry. Thermodynamics and physical properties of biochemical systems will be studied. Structure function relation of biopolymers, enzyme kinetics, drug-nucleic acid interactions, and models of mutation and chemical carcinogenesis will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered as requested/needed   /   Prerequisites: CHE 331 and CHE 345

This course develops the mathematical formalism introduced in CHE 331 and CHE 332. A more rigorous approach to molecular orbital theory is taken. The nature of the chemical bond is explored more fully and the relationship between atomic structure and chemical reactivity is probed more deeply. This course will have a significant computational component.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered as requested/needed   /   Prerequisites: CHE 333 and CHE 334L

This course is designed to continue and expand on the inorganic topics initiated in CHE 111-112. Topics discussed include binding and structure, ionic interactions, coordination chemistry, solid state chemistry, organometallic chemistry, boranes, and bioinorganic chemistry.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 332

This course deals with advanced topics not covered in CHE 221-222. Certain topics previously covered are treated in greater depth. Examples of areas which are covered include: spectroscopy, heterocycles, polynuclear aromatics, photochemistry, electrocyclic reactions, and polymers.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring semesters   /   Prerequisites: CHE 222, CHE 331

This laboratory is designed to be taken concurrently with CHE 442. Laboratory experiences are chosen to illustrate chemical principles discussed in class and to expose the student to some of the techniques and methods of characterization used in the synthesis of main group and transition metal compounds.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters

This laboratory is designed to be taken concurrently with CHE 443.

Credit Hours: 1   /  offered in spring semesters

Mechanisms of organic reactions are discussed. Physico-chemical principles are used to discuss effects of structure on modes of reaction.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered as requested/needed   /   Prerequisites: CHE 332

The student may elect an original laboratory research program or an independent study program. Both options involve the supervision of a faculty mentor and both require and oral presentation and a written report.

Credit Hours: 4   /  CHE 449L offered in fall semesters; CHE 450L offered in spring semesters

This course will explore the vast array of computational methods that are available to study chemical and biochemical problems. These methods will include molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, quantum mechanical methods including ab initio and semi-empirical methods as well as free energy perturbation methods, The potential energy surfaces involved in chemical reactions will also be studied.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered as requested/needed

Molecular modeling methods and techniques will be studied using state of the art software including SYBYL. The course will involve projects and applications using these computational methods. Basic principles of drug design will also be explored. General chemistry (2 semesters), Organic Chemistry (2 semesters), Biochemistry (1 semester) and Physical Chemistry (1 semester) are all prerequisites for this course. Three semesters of calculus and 2 semesters of computer programming are also recommended.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered as requested/needed

A three-semester requirement of all chemistry majors. The requirement is fulfilled by regular participation in a weekly meeting which includes presentations by faculty and students.

Credit Hours: 3

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. The student must work full time for one semester. Registration will occur at the beginning of this full-time semester. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevance to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. This sequence is designed for students wishing to begin their internship during the summer months. Students interested in taking an internship should see their adviser.

Credit Hours: 6   /  offered as requested/needed

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant employment experience. The student must work part time for four semesters. Registration will occur during the second and fourth semesters of the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevance to learning and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities. Students must enroll for two semesters to receive credit.

Credit Hours: 6   /  offered as requested/needed

The constituents and structure of the atmosphere; meteorological elements; weather and climate; air masses; fronts and circulation of the atmosphere; instrumentation and map reading.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring

A descriptive introduction to the science of solar systems for both science and liberal arts majors. Celestial mechanics. Kepler's laws of planetary motion, artificial satellites, motion of earth and moon and related topics. Description of the other planets, other elements of the solar system.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in spring

A descriptive introduction to the science of solar systems for both science and liberal arts majors. Celestial mechanics, Kepler's laws of planetary motion, artificial satellites, motion of earth and moon, and related topics. Description of the other planets, other elements of the solar system.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall

A description of stars in the universe for both science and liberal arts majors. Stellar distance, motion, mass, size, magnitude, temperature and classification of stars, binary stars. Stellar evolution and earth, original and evolution of the universe, cosmology.

Credit Hours: 3   /  offered in fall

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of physics including historical developments and the basic laws and principles of physics as derived from both macroscopic and microscopic phenomena. For liberal arts students.

Credit Hours: 6   /  PHY 101 offered in fall semesters; PHY 102 offered in spring semesters

This course is an introduction to the principles of physics in the context of forensic science, the application of science to law. Application of logic and probability to analyze forensic evidence will also be discussed.

Credit Hours: 6   /  offered in fall semesters

An intensive study of the principles of mechanics, wave motion, sound and heat followed in the second semester by physics; vectors and calculus are used throughout. Must be accompanied by laboratory.

Credit Hours: 8   /  PHY 121 offered in fall semesters; PHY 122 offered in spring semesters