Courses

A study of the basic functions of the human body in health and disease. This course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of elementary human physiology. It will emphasize the functional aspects of the body at the cellular, organ, and organ system levels. It is designed as a terminal nonlaboratory course for nonscience students.

Credit Hours: 3

A study of the basic principles of biology dealing with plants and animals. The course includes a laboratory and is designed for students with no prior college biology courses. Two semester hours of lecture and one semester hour of laboratory each week.

Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course in which the functioning of ecosystems is explored and related to environmental problems. The course stresses current topics of local and global interest with emphasis on how to obtain, understand, and interpret information pertaining to environmental issues. Cross-listed as ENV 103.

Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course for nonscience majors describing the fundamental principles of genetics and how they apply to humans.The nature of the gene, genetic technologies and the implications of genetics for individuals in modern society are prominent aspects of the course. It is intended for students who have had high school courses in biology and chemistry.

Credit Hours: 3

In this course, students will be introduced to the basic concepts of toxicology, as they apply to understanding how environmental contaminants pose risks to human health and the environment. This course is intended for non-biology majors.

Credit Hours: 3

A treatment of basic principles of life, and of life-related phenomena;
offers a broad base for advanced study by biology and natural science
majors.

Credit Hours: 6

This laboratory is designed to be taken concurrently with BIO 121-122 and includes an investigative approach to the study of all living organisms.

Credit Hours: 2

A study of the basic principles of botany, and a survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on the morphology and physiology of higher plants.

Credit Hours: 4

A study of the basic principles of microbiology involving pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms and their relation to medicine, sanitation, agriculture, and industry. Laboratory study concerned with the morphology and physiology of microorganisms, and with their application in identification. Must be taken concurrently with laboratory.

Credit Hours: 3

Laboratory study concerned with the morphology and physiology
of microorganisms, and with their application in identification. Must
be taken concurrently with lecture.

Credit Hours: 1

Bioinformatics is the study of biological phenomena and the data generated from such studies with the assistance of computers. Bioinformatics relies on computers for the acquisition, storage, analysis, manipulation, management and dissemination of biological information. This is an introductory course to the problems and promise in this field.

Credit Hours: 3

A unified study of the structure and function of the human body. The course will survey the anatomy and physiology of the major types of human cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. An understanding of the human body as a self-regulated, dynamic community of interrelated living parts will be emphasized. Designed to be taken sequentially.

Credit Hours: 6

The laboratory involves a series of student-performed exercises designed to illustrate, by observation and experimentation, the major concepts of human anatomy and physiology. Designed to be taken sequentially. Must be taken concurrently with lecture.

Credit Hours: 2

A study of Mendelian genetics and the molecular biology of the gene. Basic principles of genetics, as they apply in plants and animals, are studied in the laboratory with special emphasis on Drosophilia.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 121-124

This course fosters a personal, hands-on approach to understanding the natural world. It is designed to help the student become a better observer, communicator, and educator in the field of nature study. The laboratory provides opportunities to visit nature sites, conduct field studies, plan and implement educational projects, and learn from accomplished naturalists and educators. The course may include a service learning component.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: Education 236 or permission of the instructor

A course in the ecology of local plants and their habitats, designed for the student with minimal experience in ecology. By learning basic plant structure and terminology, and the interactions between plants and the environment, the student will learn the ecology of plants in a natural setting. Course activities include field trips to areas of interest and laboratory experiments. (Taught summer only)

Credit Hours: 3

A survey of plants with physiologically active properties of medicinal
interest. Emphasis is placed on the biology, folk uses, ethnobotany,
and natural history of useful angiosperms.

Credit Hours: 3

A course relating ecological principles to studies in the laboratory and field. Topics include population dynamics, energy flow in ecosystems, and species interactions.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 121/2 with C+ or better or permission of instructor

The course is designed to introduce one to the study of the interaction of chemicals with living organisms. Pharmacology encompasses the disciplines of organic chemistry, physiology, pathology, biochemistry, and molecular biology, and as such we will investigate drug action at several levels: whole body, organ, tissue, cell, and molecular. We will discuss the intricacies of the various classes of drugs, and discuss the factors that are used to assess the safety and efficacy of a drug.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: BIO 231 - 232, BIO 334, C- or better

The course material covers two areas of medical importance: virology, some of the predominant disease-causing agents; and immunology, our body’s major defense mechanisms against disease. Topics to be covered include the history, biology, molecular structure, and evolutionary significance of the components of these two systems. The recent findings in the fields will be highlighted, as they pertain to our understanding of disease.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: BIO 212

A study of the cell with emphasis on the molecular aspects of cell structure and function. Biochemical processes are emphasized.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 121-124 and second semester sophomore status.

The course encompasses the basic biology and clinical aspects of cancer. Topics to be covered include the history of oncology, basic cancer biology, and current concepts relative to the cause, prevention, detection, and treatment of benign and malignant neoplasias.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: BIO 334 or permission of the instructor

A contemporary perspective on cell function drawing upon recent findings in physiology, biochemistry, biophysics, and molecular biology. The course will highlight the cellular processes that occur outside the nucleus (in the plasma membrane, organelles and cytosol). Emphasis will be placed on learning quantitative approaches to solving problems in cell physiology.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: BIO 334

Mathematics is a fundamental component of Biology. In this course, experimental design, statistics, and simple modeling are presented from a biological perspective, in preparation for thesis and post-baccalaureate research, and fro preparation for employment in Biology.

Credit Hours: 4

This course expands on the concepts of heredity learned in Genetics (BIO 246), with emphasis placed on the genetics of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Classical genetic analysis,non-Mendelian inheritance, molecular mechanism of genetic change, and human genetics will be covered.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 246 or permission of the instructor

A study of the cells and tissues, and their involvement in organ structure. Cytological and histological slides are prepared and studied in the laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4

This course is designed to correlate basic knowledge of normal physiology with dysfunction of body mechanisms. The student will gain a basic understanding of the processes of disease through study of causative mechanisms and the signs and symptoms which reflect disease.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 231 or 232 with laboratory

Genomics and Proteomics is the detailed study of technologies and methodologies for evaluation of genomic and protein functions. These methods are used to interpret biological regulation of DNA sequences, the RNA’s that are copied from them, and the proteins that are synthesized from these RNA’s. The application of these technologies to problems in biology ranging from organism development to human diseases will be discussed.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: BIO 121-123, 334

Lectures and laboratories will emphasize contemporary bioanalytical and biological research at the cell and molecular levels. BIO 491 will stress methods employed in studies of cell physiology. BIO 492 will emphasize DNA methods of gene recombination in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Theoretical and practical competence will be developed in all techniques.

Credit Hours: 8   /   Prerequisites: BIO 334

Required of all B.S. and B.A. biology majors beginning with students entering 1994/95 academic year. The goal is to assure the readiness of students for job placement, and/or entrance into professional or graduate school by assessing the students’ knowledge and understanding of the field and their writing and speaking skills.

Credit Hours: 3

Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student’s major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis on an original project, and an oral defense.

Credit Hours: 6

The field of bioinformatics has developed as a result of the integration of information and approaches from a number of disciplines. This is an advanced course where on will be introduced to the challenges and projected outcomes of the field. It is expected that students entering this course are familiar with biological and computational techniques, as they will be used as the foundation for the laboratory portion of the course.

Credit Hours: 3

To provide a modern view of developmental biology unifying the approaches of cell biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics. This course is designed for students who have had one year of introductory biology, and one semester of cell biology. The communication of biological concepts, ideas, and experimentation, in verbal and written form, is an integral component of this course. The laboratory emphasizes molecular aspects of development.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 334, C+ or better

This course deals with plant physiology at an organismal level and with the physiological ecology or interactions of plants with their environment. The unique features of plant photosynthesis, water relations and metabolic processes will be studied in a variety of taxa and settings. Laboratory will include field trips to local areas of interest and experiments in the laboratory.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 334, C- or better or permission of the instructor

The role of molecular regulatory mechanisms as they pertain to the structure and function of genes in eukaryotic systems, the evolution of genomes and molecular techniques are emphasized.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: BIO 334, C- or better or permission of the instructor.

An advanced course providing in-depth coverage of the functions of selected cells, tissues, organs and organ systems in different animals. Emphasis will be placed on the physiological mechanisms that permit animals to cope with environmental challenges. Laboratory will feature experiments using appropriate animal model systems.

Credit Hours: 4

This course provides students with an introduction to limnology, emphasizing the physical, chemical and biological function of north temperate lakes and streams. Lecture topics include the physics and chemistry of continental waters, the major biotic communities, interactions among these communities, and interactions between humans and the aquatic environment. Laboratory exercises and field trips provide a practical introduction to the methods of aquatic sciences.

Credit Hours: 4   /   Prerequisites: BIO 312, C- or better or permission of the instructor

This special topics course provides students with opportunities to study current topics in the biological sciences. Biology is a rapidly changing field and thus many current issues are unable to be fully addressed in traditional course offerings. This includes topics in environmental science, bioinformatics and other evolving fields. Students may repeat the course two additional times as the topic changes.

Prerequisites: permission of the instructor

Training and professional experience in the environment. Interns do 60 hours of service training, maintain log record and write a personal career evaluation based on the intern experience.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: Permission of the chairperson, 3.0 GPA in the major

Off-campus health science work and professional experiences sponsored by an appropriate professional organization, company or private practitioner. Internships are generally unpaid and involve student commitments of 60 hours of service to the sponsoring organization and 10 class hours of didactic instruction.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: Permission of the chairperson, 3.0 GPA in the major

A junior or senior work-study program providing relevant paid
employment experience. Registration will occur at the beginning of
the experience. The objective of the program is to integrate classroom
theory and practical work experience, thus lending relevancy to learning
and providing the student with a realistic exposure to career opportunities.
Students interested in taking a co-op should talk to their adviser.

Credit Hours: 3   /   Prerequisites: (1) Upper class status - junior or senior. (2) A 3.0 GPA in the major. (3) The acceptance of his/her proposed work by a department faculty member. (4) Completed work on the project by the end of one semester - written report.